4 Sewing Books That Make Great Gifts


So now you have the machine, the tools and equipment, a class registration, and some fabric from our shop-- what else could there be?

SEWING BOOKS! I love a good sewing book. I prefer text book style books over pattern books (there's just so many patterns everywhere that I can't always justify buying a pattern book) and I'm the kind of sewing nerd that gets a new book and breaks out the highlighter in case there's something new to learn (and there always is)!

As with my other posts, the links below are Amazon Affiliate links. If you purchase through that link there's a little something in it for me. I'm in no other way compensated for these reviews. These are just my favorite books from my sewing shelf and I want to share them! Also, as with everything I recommend, Amazon is a great way to buy things, but local is better, so if you have a local book store that sell these or can order them (always ask if they can order!) please buy there first!

First up... The Sewing Machine Classroom by Charlene Phillips

This is an excellent book chock full of very technical information. I've been sewing for years and still broke out the highlighter on several occassions when I first read it. It's an excellent reference book to have in your sewing library. But there's a BUT. The author is very exact-- there is one way, and one way only to do "it" (whatever "it" may be) in her opinion. There are a lot of "musts" and "nevers". I don't believe in that kind of sewing. There are plenty of things in the book that are "musts" that I've never done and my sewing is perfectly fine. So take it with a grain of salt. It's one of my favrotie books but don't let it get you worked up if you're not doing everything she says to do.

How to Speak Fluent Sewing by Christine Haynes

Here's another wonderful reference book that's especially useful for the new sewists library. It's a dictionary of sewing terms with perfect little illustrations. As an experienced sewist I only found one term that I was unfamiliar with (granted it was at the exact moment I need it) but if you're just starting it's a great book to have next to your machine.

Better Homes and Gardens: Complete Guide to Quilting

Don't let the slightly dated front cover scare you off from this book. This is the best quilting reference I own. It was the first sewing book I ever purchased and I can't tell you how may times I've opened it. Not only does it go into detail about quilt sizes, styles, cutting fabric, and binding methods but there's a wonderful section on color theory that's helpful for all sewing projects. Again, just look past the slightly dated fabrics!

And last but not least...

A Field Guide to Fabric Design by Kimberly Kight

This book isn't about sewing, but about the fabric (and fabric is at least half the fun of sewing). The premise is how to design your own fabric and it goes into detail about using Photoshop, Illustrator and hand methods to print your own fabric (my first attempt at fabric design is shown on the bag in the background). However, it is also a wonderful reference for the elements of fabric design: patterns, volume, colorways, etc. I use it as a reference for mixing fabrics more oftne than I do for how to design fabric.

There are so many excellent sewing books out there, but these are the ones I go back to again and again and again. I hope you find them as useful as I do!

Happy Stitching!

Laura

#book #gifts

12 views

© 2015- 2020 by Hartford Stitch

Phone: (860) 785-3093

207 Park Rd, Second Floor, West Hartford, CT 06119

  • b-facebook
  • Instagram - Black Circle